Archive for the ‘WWII Quotes’ Category

“This is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning.” – Winston Churchill (November 10, 1942)

Sir Winston Churchill (11/20/1874 — 1/24/1965) was a British politician and statesman who was known for his leadership during WWII. He is regarded as one of the great wartime leaders and served as prime minister from 1940-1945 and again from 1951-1955. Churchill was well known for his speeches, which were a great inspiration to the British people, as well as to the Allied forces. Upon his death, the Queen granted him the honor of a state funeral which saw one of the largest assemblies of statesmen in the world.

“We are not retreating — we are advancing in another direction.” – General Douglas MacArthur

Douglas MacArthur (January 26, 1880 – April 5, 1964) was an American general and a field marshal of the Philippine Army. He was a Chief of Staff of the US Army during the 1930s and played a prominent role in the Pacific theater during World War II.

“Americans love to fight. All real Americans love the sting of battle.” -General George S. Patton, Jr.

No bastard ever won a war by dying for his country. He won it by making the other poor dumb bastard die for his country. – General George S. Patton

Americans love to fight. All real Americans love the sting of battle. -General George S. Patton

“Never underestimate a man who overestimates himself.” — President F.D. Roosevelt referring to Douglas MacArthur

Franklin Delano Roosevelt (01/30/1882 — 04/12/1945), also known by his initials FDR, was the 32nd President of the United States and the only president elected into more than two terms in office. FDR was a central figure in world events during the mid-20th century, leading the U.S. during a time of worldwide economic crisis and war, and worked closely with Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin in leading the Allies against Germany and Japan in World War II.

“Soldiers, Sailors, and Airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Force: You are about to embark upon the Great Crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you….I have full confidence in your courage, devotion to duty and skill in battle.” – Order of the Day, 6 June, 1944 – General Dwight D. Eisenhower

General Dwight D Eisenhower (10/14/1890 — 03/39/1969) was a five-star general in the U.S. Army. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, Eisenhower was responsible for creating the major war plans to defeat Japan and Germany which he did until June 1942. He then served as Supreme Commander of the Allied forces in Europe during World War II and was responsible for planning and supervising the invasion of Germany and France from 1944 until 1945. General Eisenhower became the 34th President of the United States in 1953 and remained in office until 1961.

WWII Quote of the Day: May 13: Humility must always be the portion of any man who receives acclaim earned in blood of his followers and sacrifices of his friends. - General Dwight D. Eisenhower→ Read more

“Hell is on us.” – Mamoru Shigemitsu , June 1944 (capture of Saipan)

Mamoru Shigemitsu  (07/29/1887 — 01/26/1957) was appointed ambassador to the Nanjing Nationalist Government two days after the attack on Pearl Harbor and by the end of WWII was the Japanese Minister of Foreign Affairs. He came into that position on April 20, 1943, when Japan’s Premier, Hideki Tojo, fired foreign minister Masayuki Tani, which was viewed as a sign that Japan was preparing for a collapse of the Axis Powers. Mamoru Shigemitsu and General Yoshijiro Umezu signed the instrument of surrender on September 2, 1945.

“I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, nor the arrow for its swiftness, nor the warrior for his glory. I love only that which they defend.” – J.R.R Tolkien

John Ronald Reuel Tolkein, CBE (01/03/1982 — 09/02/1973) was an English writer, university professor, poet, and philologist. J.R.R. Tolkein was best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. In the days leading up to World War II, he was earmarked as a codebreaker and in January of 1939 he was asked, in the event of national emergency, if he was prepared to serve in the cryptographic department of the Foreign Office. He confirmed his willingness to serve and began taking an instructional course at the London HQ of the Government Code and Cypher School on March 27, 1939. While he was willing to serve, he was informed in October that his services wouldn’t be required and ultimately he never served as a codebreaker.