Archive for WW 2 Pin Up Girls

The World Book Dictionary defines pinup as: “Noun 1. A picture of a very attractive or famous person, pinned up on a wall, as in a barracks, usually by admirers who have not met the subject. 2. A very attractive girl, especially one considered attractive enough to be the subject of such a picture.”

May
21

WWII Pin Up Sheila Ryan

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Sheila Ryan Cover Yank Magazine

 

Gorgeous Seila RyanBorn Katherine Elizabeth McLaughlin on June 8, 1921 in Topeka, Kansas, she went to Hollywood in 1939 at the age of 18. She was signed by 20th Century Fox in 1940 and was credited in her early films as Bettie McLaughlin. Adopting the name Sheila Ryan, she starred in “Dressed to Kill” (1941) the following year. She appeared in other memorable films, including two Laurel and Hardy movies, “Great Guns” (1941) and “A-Haunting We Will Go” (1942), and the Busby Berkeley musical “The Gang’s All Here” (1943). Ryan appeared in a several Charlie Chan and Michael Shayne mysteries, starring alongside Cesar Romero.

By the late 1940s, however, her career waned and she began appearing mostly in B movies, especially low budget westerns. In 1945, she married actor Allan Lane, but the marriage ended in divorce after a few months.

She later worked with Gene Autry, starring in several of his films, including “The Cowboys and the Indians” (1949), and “Mule Train” (1950). She also had roles in several television shows.Sheila Ryan Pin Up Doll

While working with Autry, Ryan met actor Pat Buttram (known for his role as “Mr. Haney” in the 1965—1971 television comedy Green Acres). They married in 1952, and remained together until her death in 1975. They had a daughter, Kathleen Buttram, nicknamed (Kerry).

Sheila Ryan retired from acting in 1958. She died in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles, California in 1975 from lung cancer. She was 54 years old. She was survived by Pat and their daughter Kerry. Pat later died of kidney failure on January 8, 1994 and later on their daughter Kerry Buttram-Galgano died of cancer in 2007.

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Cindy Garner - YANK Pinup Girl - April 6th, 1945

Cindy Garner - YANK Pinup Girl - April 6th, 1945

Cindy GarnerNot much is known about Cindy Garner. She appeared in movies such as “Red Ball Express”, “Ma and Pa Kettle at Waikiki”, and “Till the End of Time”.

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May
14

PinUp Judith Barrett

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Judith Barrett

Judith Barret - SultryJudith Barrett was born Lucille Kelly on February 2, 1914 in Arlington, Texas, the daughter of a cattle rancher, Barrett made several appearances at The Palace Theatre, Dallas while still at school. Her first big chance came when she started in a lavish commercial film in 1928, “The Stock Exchange” opposite Bobby Vernon. In 1929 she went to Hollywood, starred in five films, and made a successful transition to “talking films”. From 1928 to 1933 she was billed as “Nancy Dover”, and from 1930 to 1933 she appeared in nine films, all credited. In 1933 she only appeared in one film, “Marriage Humor” opposite Harry Langdon and Vernon Dent, while doing stage work. She would not have another role until 1936, when she starred in the crime drama “Yellowstone” opposite Henry Hunter, and alongside Ralph Morgan and Alan Hale. It was the first film that she was billed as “Judith Barrett”. She appeared in two films that year, and five in 1937, one of which was her first uncredited role.

From 1938 to 1940 Barrett appeared in ten films, all credited. Barrett retired from film acting following her appearance in the 1940 film “Those Were the Days!”, starring William Holden and Bonita Granville.

She eventually settled in Palm Desert, California, where she was residing at the time of her death on March 10, 2000.

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May
07

Ingrid Bergman Pin Up

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Ingrid Bergman

 

Ingrid Bergman Head ShotIngrid Bergman was born in Stockholm, Sweden, on August 29, 1915. The woman who would be one of the top stars in Hollywood in the 1940s had decided to become an actress after finishing her formal schooling. She had had a taste of acting at age 17 when she played an uncredited role of a girl standing in line in the Swedish film “Landskamp” (1932) in 1932 – not much of a beginning for a girl who would be known as “Sweden’s illustrious gift to Hollywood.” Her parents died when she was just a girl and the uncle she lived with didn’t want to stand in the way of Ingrid’s dream. The next year she enrolled in the Swedish Royal Theatre but decided that stage acting was not for her. It would be three more years before she would have another chance at a film. When she did, it was more than just a bit part. The film in question was “Munkbrogreven” (1935), where she had a speaking part as Elsa Edlund. After several films that year that established her as a class actress, Ingrid appeared in “Intermezzo” (1936) as Anita Hoffman. Luckily for her, American producer David O. Selznick saw it and sent a representative from Selznick International Pictures to gain rights to the story and have Ingrid signed to a contract. Once signed, she came to California and starred in United Artists’ 1939 remake of her 1936 film, “Intermezzo: A Love Story” (1939), reprising her original role. The film was a hit and so was Ingrid. Her beauty was unlike anything the movie industry had seen before and her acting was superb. Hollywood was about to find out that they had the most versatile actress the industry had ever seen. Here was a woman who truly cared about the craft she represented. The public fell in love with her. Ingrid was under contract to go back to Sweden to film “En enda natt” (1939) in 1939 and “Juninatten” (1940) in 1940. Back in the US she appeared in three films, all well-received. She made only one film in 1942, but it was the classic “Casablanca” (1942) opposite the great Humphrey Bogart.
Ingrid Bergman Yank Magazine Cover
Ingrid was choosing her roles well. In 1943 she was nominated for an Academy Award for her role in “For Whom the Bell Tolls” (1943), the only film she made that year. The critics and public didn’t forget her when she made “Gaslight” (1944) the following year–her role of Paula Alquist got her the Oscar for Best Actress. In 1945 Ingrid played in “Spellbound” (1945), “Saratoga Trunk” (1945) and “The Bells of St. Mary’s” (1945), for which she received her third Oscar nomination for her role of Sister Benedict. She made no films in 1947, but bounced back with a fourth nomination for “Joan of Arc” (1948). In 1949 she went to Italy to film “Stromboli” (1950), directed by Roberto Rossellini. She fell in love with him and left her husband, Dr. Peter Lindstrom, and daughter, Pia Lindström. America’s “moral guardians” in the press and the pulpits were outraged. She was pregnant and decided to remain in Italy, where her son was born. In 1952 Ingrid had twins, Isotta and Isabella Rossellini, who became an outstanding actress in her own right, as did Pia. Ingrid continued to make films in Italy and finally returned to Hollywood in 1956 in the title role in “Anastasia” (1956), which was filmed in England. For this she won her second Academy Award. She had scarcely missed a beat. Ingrid continued to bounce between Europe and the US making movies, and fine ones at that. A film with Ingrid Bergman was sure to be a quality production. In her final big-screen performance in 1978’s “Höstsonaten” (1978) she had her final Academy Award nomination. Though she didn’t win, many felt it was the most sterling performance of her career. Ingrid retired, but not before she gave an outstanding performance in the mini-series “A Woman Called Golda” (1982) (TV), a film about Israeli prime minister Golda Meir. For this she won an Emmy Award as Best Actress, but, unfortunately, she didn’t live to see the fruits of her labor. Ingrid died from cancer on August 30, 1982, the day after her 67th birthday, in London, England.

Ingrid Bergman Globe
TRIVIA:

Height: 5′ 9″ (1.75 m)

Measurements: 34-24-34

Her famous love affair with the war photographer, Robert Capa was the basis for Alfred Hitchcock’s “Rear Window” (1954).

During the making of “Casablanca” (1942), Humphrey Bogart’s wife Mayo Methot continually accused him of having an affair with Bergman, often confronting him in his dressing room before a shot. Bogart would come onto the set in a rage.

Swedes are very proud of Bergman. They even have “Ingrid Bergman Square” with a statue of the screen goddess looking out over the water to her former home. Her ashes were scattered over the sea nearby.

Received a fan letter from James Stewart on his way to combat duty for World War II (1943).

One day at the studio she hooked bumpers with another car. A studio policeman found her tugging and heaving with all her might. The policeman said, “Darndest thing I ever saw. First film star I ever knew that didn’t mind getting her hands dirty”.

Enjoyed working with Gary Cooper, for she did not have to take off her shoes.

Ingrid Bergman Glamour Shot

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Rita Hayworth Yank Magazine Pin Up July 7, 1944

Rita Hayworth Yank Pin Up July 7, 1944

Rita Hayworth SmilingMargarita Carmen Cansino was born in New York on October 17, 1918 into a family of dancers. Her father, Eduardo was a dancer as was his father before him. He immigrated from Spain in 1913. Rita’s mother met Eduardo in 1916 and were married the following year. Rita, herself, was trained as a dancer in order to follow in her family’s footsteps. She joined her family on stage when she was 8 when her family was filmed in a movie called “La fiesta” (1926) (aka La Fiesta). It was her first film appearance, albeit uncredited, but by no means was it to be her last.

Rita Hayworth Swimsuit Rita was seen dancing by a Fox executive and was impressed enough to offer her a contract. Rita’s “second” debut was in the film “Cruz Diablo” (1934) at the age of 16. She continued to play small bit parts in several films under the name of “Rita Cansino” until she played the second female lead in “Only Angels Have Wings” (1939) when she played “Judy McPherson”. By this time, she was at Columbia where she was getting top billing but it was the Warner Brothers film “The Strawberry Blonde” (1941) that seemed to set her apart from the rest of what she had previously done. This was the film that exuded the warmth and seductive vitality that was to make her famous. Her natural, raw beauty was showcased later that year in “Blood and Sand” (1941) filmed in Technicolor.

She was probably the second most popular actress after Betty Grable. In “You’ll Never Get Rich” (1941) with Fred Astaire, in 1941, was probably the film that moviegoers felt close to Rita. Her dancing, for which she had trained all her life, was astounding. After the hit “Gilda” (1946), her career was on the skids. Although she was still making movies, they never approached her earlier work. The drought began between “The Lady from Shanghai” (1947) and “Champagne Safari” (1952). Then after “Salome” (1953), she was not seen again until “Pal Joey” (1957). Part of the reasons for the downward spiral was television, but also Rita had been replaced by the new star at Columbia, Kim Novak. After a few, rather forgettable films in the 1960s, her career was essentially over. Her final film was The “Wrath of God” (1972).

Ritay Hayworth Makeup Her career was really never the same after “Gilda” (1946). Her dancing had made the film and had made her. Perhaps Gene Ringgold said it best when he remarked, “Rita Hayworth is not an actress of great depth. She was a dancer, a glamorous personality and a sex symbol. These qualities are such that they can carry her no further professionally”. Perhaps he was right but Hayworth fans would vehemently disagree with him. Rita, herself, said, “Every man I have known has fallen in love with Gilda and wakened with me”.

By 1980, Rita was wracked with Alzheimer’s Disease. It ravaged her so, that she finally died on May 14, 1987 in New York City. She was 68.

 

Rita by the PoolTRIVIA:

Measurements: 36.5-C-24-36 (at peak of WW-II pin-up fame), 35-25-35 (in 1953 at 120 lbs.) (Source: Celebrity Sleuth magazine).

Height: 5′ 6″ (1.68 m)

Spouse:
James Hill (2 February 1958 – 7 September 1961) (divorced)
Dick Haymes (24 September 1953 – 12 December 1955) (divorced)
Prince Aly Khan (27 May 1949 – 26 January 1953) (divorced) 1 child
Orson Welles (7 September 1943 – 1 December 1948) (divorced) 1 child
Edward Charles Holmgren Judson – (29 May 1937 – 22 May 1942) (divorced)

Some legends say the Margarita cocktail was named for her when she was dancing under her real name in a Tijuana, Mexico nightclub.

The famous red hair was not her natural color (which was black). When she was signed, studio heads decided that her hairline was too low on her forehead, and she underwent years of painful electrolysis to make it higher.

Knocked out two of Glenn Ford’s teeth during their fight in Gilda (1946).

Her singing was dubbed by Nan Wynn (1941-44), Martha Mears (1945), Anita Ellis (1946-48), and Jo Ann Greer (1952-57).

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