Archive for the ‘WW 2 Pin Up Girls’ Category

Andrea King was born Georgette Andre Barry in Paris, France, however she lived there only two months before her mother, Belle Hart, brought her back to the United States.→ Read more
Vivian Austin was born Vivian Coe on February 23, 1920 in Hollywood, California. A former Miss Hollywood and a dancer, this Universal contract starlet of the 1940s entered films as a Goldwyn Girl in "The Goldwyn Follies" (1938).→ Read more
Frances Vorne, a 19-year-old New York girl who calls herself "The Shape", wound up 1944 with perhaps the best claim to an honor publicity agents fight desperately over: the crown as Pin-Up Girl of the Year.→ Read more
Gloria Mildred DeHaven was born on July 23, 1925 in Los Angeles, California, the daughter of actor-director Carter DeHaven and actress Flora Parker DeHaven.→ Read more

Carole Landis

Carole Landis was born on New Year’s Day in 1919 in Fairchild, Wisconsin, as Frances Lillian Mary Ridste. Her childhood was, for the most part, normal. Her father, a railroad mechanic, was of Norwegian descent and her mother was Polish. Her father left the family and Carole, her mother and an older brother and sister were left to fend for themselves.

Once she graduated from high school, she married Irving Wheeler, but the union lasted a month before the marriage was annulled because Carole was only 15 at the time. The couple remarried in August of 1934 and the two headed to California to start a new life. For a while she worked as a dancer and singer, but it wasn’t long before the glitter of show business drew her to Los Angeles.

She won a studio contract with Warner Brothers, but was a bit player for the most part in such films as “A Star Is Born” (1937), “A Day at the Races” (1937), and “The Emperor’s Candlesticks” (1937). The following year started out much the same way with more bit roles. Carole’s career was stalled. By 1939, she was getting a few more into speaking roles, although mostly one-liners, and that year ended much like the previous two years with more bit roles, plus a divorce from Wheeler.

In 1940 she was cast as Loana in the Hal Roach production of “One Million B.C.” (1940), where her beauty (and skimpy outfit) finally got her recognition, and her career finally began moving. She didn’t star in big productions but began getting parts in B pictures. Although she had a fine acting talent, the really good roles were snatched up by the established stars of the day. Warner Brothers then sold her contract to 20th Century-Fox. She played “B” leads and “A” supporting roles in her first 12 Fox films, with a notable dramatic performance in “I Wake Up Screaming” (1941). Critics dwelled on her fresh-faced beauty, seldom mentioning her acting and comedy potential. Her busiest year ever turned out to be 1942, with roles in six films such as “Manila Calling” (1942), “The Powers Girl” (1943) and “A Gentleman at Heart” (1942). It seemed that her films never really attracted good critical reviews, and if they were reviewed at all it was in reference to Carole’s breathtaking beauty.

During World War 2 Carole spent more time visiting troops than any other actress. She took time off from her career and dedicated herself to the war effort. Carole toured the country selling war bonds and entertained soldiers all over the world. The press called her “a heroine” and “pride of the yanks”. She joined the Hollywood Victory Committee and worked tirelessly with the Red Cross, the Naval Aid Auxiliary, and Bundles for Blue Jackets. Carole collected cigarettes for the soldiers, taught first aid, and donated blood as often as she was allowed. She never turned down a request to help and visited more than 250 military bases across the United States. When she went to Camp Bowie for a three day appearance in 1942 she danced with 200 soldiers, sang 15 songs, and signed 1000 autographs. In September 1942 she visited the Mare Island Navy Yard where she sang for the injured men in the hospital ward. Carole became one of the soldier’s favorite pin-up girls and they nicknamed her “The Blonde Bomber”. When she appeared on the Command Performance radio show one soldier requested that she “just sigh” into the microphone. In November 1942 Carole started a five month tour of Europe and Africa with Mitzi Mayfair, Kay Francis, and Martha Raye. She met her husband Tommy Wallace during this tour and she wrote about her experiences in her 1944 book “Four Jills In A Jeep”. In the film version, “Four Jills in a Jeep” (1944), you can get a glimpse of the kind of talent she really had, and which Fox was wasting.

Carole was a hostess at the Hollywood Canteen and she invited soldiers to her beach house every weekend. In June 1944 she began a U.S.O. tour with Jack Benny, singer Martha Tilton, harmonica player Larry Adler, and pianist June Bruner. During their camp shows Carole sang and jitterbugged with the boys. She spent much of her time visiting wounded soldiers and she wrote hundreds of letters to their families. Jack Benny said “You soon forgot she was Carole Landis, the sex symbol, the Hollywood star, the sweater girl, because she was a real human being and had a warm heart that spilled over with kindness”.

During their two month tour of the South Pacific Carole almost died when she contracted malaria and amoebic dysentery. She was hospitalized for weeks, lost 15 pounds, and suffered with these illnesses for the rest of her life. Carole became an Air Raid Warden, a commander in the Aerial Nurses Corps, and an honorary Colonel in the American Legion. She auctioned off her favorite opal ring to raise money and she donated several movie projectors to bases overseas. Carole traveled more than 125,000 miles during the war. She performed for soldiers in Australia, Brazil, Algeria, Bermuda, Scotland, England, New Guinea, Ireland, Guam, and New Zealand. Carole said “Whatever we do for soldiers can’t be enough in return for what they do for us. They are wonderful!”

By the middle 1940s her career was beginning to short-circuit. Her contract with 20th Century-Fox had been canceled, failed marriages to Willis Hunt Jr. and Thomas Wallace, her current marriage to Horace Schmidlapp on the skids, plus a battle with poor health spelled disaster for her professionally and personally. Her final two films were released in 1948, “Brass Monkey” (1948) and “Noose” (1948). On July 5, 1948, Carole committed suicide by taking an overdose of seconal in her Brentwood Heights, California, home. She was only 29 and had made 49 pictures, unfortunately, mostly forgettable ones. If Hollywood moguls had given Carole a good chance, she could have been one of the brightest stars in its history.

TRIVIA:

Measurements: 37C-24-35

Height: 5′ 5″ (1.66 m)

Nicknames: The ‘Ping’ Girl The Blonde Bomber The Chest

Carole protested strongly and publicly against the nonsensical nickname “Ping Girl” (apparently short for “purring”) coined by Hal Roach publicist Frank N. Seltzer in April 1940.

She knew how to fly a plane. Carole started taking flying lessons with her second husband Willis Hunt and got her pilots license in 1941. During World War 2 she flew for the Civilian Air Patrol.

In 1944 Carole appeared in ads for Chesterfield cigarettes. During her career she was also featured in ads for Lipton tea, Schaefer beer, Jergens lotion, Sinclair oil, and Nescafe coffee.

On her family’s official web site they claim that Carole’s death was not a suicide, they believe someone murdered her.

Myrna Williams, later to become Myrna Loy, was born on August 2, 1905 in Radersburg, Montana.Later on her family moved to Helena where she spent her youth. At the age of 13, Myrna’s father died of Spanish Flu and the rest of the family moved to Los Angeles.

She attended the Westlake School for Girls, in Los Angeles, where she caught the acting bug. She started at the age of 15 when she appeared in local stage productions in order to help support her family.  Mrs. Rudolph Valentino happened to be in the audience one night who managed to pull some strings to get Myrna some parts in her first movies.

Her first film was a small part in the production of “What Price Beauty?” (1925). Later that same year she appeared in “Pretty Ladies” (1925) along with Joan Crawford.

She was one of the few stars tto start in the silent movies and make a successful transition into the sound era. In the silent films, Myrna would appear as an exotic femme fatale. Later in the sound era, she would become a refined, wholesome character.

Her big break came in 1926, when she appeared in the Warner Brothers film “Satan in Sables” (1925) which landed her a contract. Her first appearance as a contract player was “The Caveman” (1926) where she played a maid. Although she was typecast over and over again as a vamp, Myrna continued to stay busy with small parts. Finally, in 1927, she received star billing in “Bitter Apples”.

When her contract ran out with Warner Brothers she signed with MGM where she landed two classic roles. “The Prizefighter and the Lady” (1933), and the other as Nora Charles in “The Thin Man” (1934) with William Powell. After “The Thin Man” (1934), Myrna would appear in five more in the series. Myrna was now a big box-office draw. So much so that in 1936, she was named Queen of the Movies and Clark Gable the king in a nationwide poll of movie goers. Her popularity was at its zenith.

When war broke out  Myrna donned a uniform when she joined the Hollywood Chapter of ‘Bundles for Bluejackets’ – helping to run a Naval Auxiliary Canteen and going on fund raising tours. Myrna set up entertainment programs for military hospitals in the Eastern United States, visiting many hospitals herself, where she was very moved by the plight of the soldiers she saw there.

She continued to make films through the 40s and 50s but the roles were fewer and fewer. By the 1960’s the parts had all but dried up as producers and directors looked elsewhere for talent. In 1960 she appeared in “Midnight Lace” (1960) and was not in another until 1969 in “The April Fools” (1969).

Myrna passed away during surgery, on December 14, 1993, in New York City at the age of 88, she had appeared in a phenomenal 129 motion pictures. She was buried in Helena, Montana.

TRIVIA:

Nickname: Queen of Hollywood The Perfect Wife Queen of the Movies Minnie

Measurements: 35 1/2-26 1/2-33 1/2 (from MGM’s designer Adrian), (Source: Celebrity Sleuth magazine)

Height: 5′ 6″

Spouse: Howland H. Sargeant     (1 June 1951 – 31 May 1960) (divorced) Gene Markey     (3 January 1946 – 21 August 1950) (divorced) John Hertz Jr.     (6 June 1942 – 21 August 1944) (divorced) Arthur Hornblow Jr.     (27 June 1936 – 1 June 1942) (divorced)

K. T. Stevens was born Gloria Wood on July 20, 1919 in Los Angeles, California. She certainly had the requisite genes for an acting career as her father was the legendary director Sam Wood.→ Read more
Francis was born in Sioux City, Iowa, on June 16, 1922. As the Depression took its hold on America, her family moved to Los Angeles when she was 9 in search of work.→ Read more
Little known singer/actress Gale Robbins was a knockout-looking hazel-eyed redhead who made a slight dent in post-war Hollywood.→ Read more
Candy Jones, originally known as Jessica Arline Wilcox, was born on December 31, 1925 in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. She was raised and educated in Atlantic City, New Jersey.→ Read more